Results for tabard

Definitions of tabard:

part of speech: noun

An ancient close- fitting garment, open at the sides, with wide sleeves, or flaps, reaching to the elbows. It was worn over the body armor, and was generally emblazoned with the arms of the wearer or of his lord. At first the tabard was very long, reaching to the mid- leg, but it was afterwards made shorter. It was at first chiefly worn by the military, but afterwards became an ordinary article of dress among other classes in France and England in the middle ages. In England the tabard is now only worn by heralds and pursuivants of arms, and is embroidered with the arms of the sovereign. This garment gave name to the ancient hostelry from which Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims started.

part of speech: noun

An ancient sort of mantle or tunic, open at the sides, with wide sleeves reaching to the elbows; a herald's coat.

part of speech: noun

Formerly, a short, coarse outer coat; a loose garment or mantle worn over armor; the coat of an ancient herald.

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